Weisshorn

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Weisshorn

Photo of the Weisshorn
Weisshorn seen from Zinal Rothorn

General
Elevation 4,506 m14,783.465 ft
2.8 miles
Prominence 1,239 m0.77 miles
4,064.961 ft
Location Valais, Switzerland
Range Pennine Alps
Massif Weisshorn Group
Sponsored Links

Coordinates
DMS Coor. 46°06´06"N, 7°42´58"E
Swiss Coor. 621450 / 105563
Links Topographic Detail

Coordinates Information

Nearby Features
Arpitettaz Hut, Bishorn, Brunegghorn, Schalihorn, Schalijoch Bivouac Hut, Tête de Milon, Weisshorn Group, Weisshorn Hut, Wisse Schijen
Alpinist's Info
Base(s) Anniviers, Randa, Zermatt, Zinal
Hut(s) Arpitettaz Hut, Schalijoch Bivouac Hut, Tracuit Hut, Weisshorn Hut
Topo. Map SLK 1328: Randa
Easiest Route Rating AD AD
Map
Weisshorn (Switzerland )
Weisshorn
Weisshorn
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Contents

[edit] General information

The Weisshorn (4,506 m14,783.465 ft
2.8 miles
) (German, lit. White Peak) is a mountain in the Pennine Alps, in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. It is one of the major peaks in the Alps and overtops the Matterhorn by some 30 meters. The mountain is considered by many the finest mountain in the Alps on account of its size and regular shape - three principal ridges and three faced, each of similar dimensions - and its relative isolation. Leslie Stephen in his masterpiece The Playground of Europe describes it as 'an almost faultless mountain'.

[edit] Geology

The Weisshorn is situated in the Swiss canton of Valais on a north-south orientated chain separating the Val d'Anniviers to the west and the Mattertal to the east. After the Dom, the Weisshorn is the second-highest Alpine summit situated completely out the main chain and on both sides the water end up in the Rhône river. The mountain has a pyramidal shape consisting of three faces. The north-east face is glaciated while the west and south-east faces are rocky. The mountain is connected to the Bishorn (4,153 m13,625.328 ft
2.581 miles
) by its north ridge, on which lies the Grand Gendarme (4,331 m). The Weisshorn massif is partially covered by glaciers: the Turtmann and Brunegg Glacier north of the summit of Bishorn, Weisshorn and Moming Glacier on the west and Schali Glacier on the south-east. The Weisshorn is one of the many peaks surrounding the region of Zermatt, along with the Dent Blanche, the Dent d'Hérens, the Matterhorn and Monte Rosa.

[edit] Climbing history

The mountain was first climbed on 19 August 1861 by the 29-year-old physicist John Tyndall, with guides J. J. Bennen and Ulrich Wenger. Their itinerary corresponds to the normal route for climbing the mountain today: the east ridge, starting from the Weisshorn Hut.

In 1877, another route was opened by W. E. Davidson, J. W. Hartley and H. S. Hoare, with guides P. Rubi, J. Juan and A. Pollinger. After climbing part of the lower south-east face above the Schali Glacier, they reached the Schaligrat (south-west ridge) and continued to the summit. The complete ridge (which was considered too difficult and dangerous in its lower part) was first climbed in 1895 by J. M. Biner, A. Imboden and E. Broome.

The south-east face was completely climbed in 1906 by Geoffrey Winthrop Young, V. J. Ryan, Lochmatter and P. Knubel.

The glaciated north-east face was first climbed in 1871 by J. H. Kitson with guides Christian Almer and his son. Almer wanted to reach the summit by nine o'clock in the morning while Kitson's wife watched them from the Gornergrat. In fact the difficulties were more serious than expected and they didn't reach the summit before midday. Shortly after, the ascent was repeated by W. A. B. Coolidge and Meta Brevoort. Both expeditions climbed the part of the face below the Grand Gendarme and continued near the north ridge. In 1909 G. W. Young and J. Knubel climbed the face by the central spur.

The west face was first climbed in 1879 by G. A. Passingham with guides F. Imseng and L. Zurbrücken. Other routes on the face were opened in 1883 and 1889. The easiest passage on the east face was found in 1900 by G. W. Young, who climbed the spur under the Grand Gendarme with L. and B. Theytaz by a route known as the Younggrat. The first winter ascent of the Younggrat was probably by S. Albasini and C. Portmann on 20 Jan. 1989.

The summit of the Grand Gendarme on the unexplored north ridge was first reached in 1898. One month later, on 21 September 1898, H. Biehly and H. Burgener made the first complete traverse on the north ridge to the summit from the Bishorn.

The north-east buttress route was opened by O. Smith and G. Young with J. Knubel on 31 Aug. 1909 and the first winter ascent was done by P. Etter, U. Gantenbein and A. and E. Scherrer on 29/30 Dec. 1969.

The nort-east face direct was done by H. Rouquette, P. Gabarrou and P.A. Steiner on 16 Sept. 1980 although the route had been previously descended on skis: M. Burtscher and K. Jeschke, 6 July 1978.

The east face of north-east buttress route was established by G. Bonfanti and R. Quagliotto on 17 July 1983.

[edit] Accidents

In 1888 George Winkler was killed in a fall on the west face. He left Zinal alone on 17 August, without telling others his precise route. The rescue team only found a photo and a hat near an avalanche cone. His body was not found until the summer of 1956, on the Weisshorn Glacier.

John Garforth Cockin was also killed making a solo attempt on the south-east face twelve years later.

In 1925 Eleonore Noll-Hasenclever, H. Pfann and H. Trier were caught in an avalanche on the north-east face when they tried to reach the east ridge after interrupting their ascent on the north ridge on account of adverse weather conditions. Pfann and Trier survived, but Hasenclever died from asphyxiation.

In April and May of 1991, two consecutive rockslides took place from a cliff above the town of Randa on the east side of the massif.

An Alouette III helicopter from Air Zermatt crashed on a night flight on the Schali Glacier (south of the peak) on 31 July 1983. The helicopter was carrying the pilot, his assistant and a mountain guide who was searching for two missing alpinists. A false alarm made the pilot try to land the helicopter on the glacier at 3,160 m. All the crew were severely injured but the guide and pilot survived. The two missing alpinists were later found dead.

[edit] Routes

The best climbing is along the ridges, the faces are exposed to objective dangers although the much neglected NE face is worth attention. Undoubtedly the most satisfying way of climbing the peak is to ascend one of the ridges and descend another, usually the E ridge will be chosen for descent. A not unpopular expedition is to make a double crossing of the summit - the Croix du Weisshorn. This involves climbing the Schaligrat (SSW ridge) and descending the NNW ridge (usually refered to as the N ridge) to the Tracuit Hut. From there cross to the Ar Pitetta Hut and climb the Younggrat and N ridge back to the summit before descending the E ridge to the Weisshorn Hut. A. and A. Salamin completed this circuit in an astonishing 7.5h on 19 Aug. 1981 although they missed out visiting the first two huts.

red: E ridge; green: SSW ridge (Schaligrat)
red: E ridge; blue: N ridge; pink: NE buttress; cyan: E face of NE buttress; yellow: E face direct
green: SSW ridge (Schaligrat); blue: N ridge; orange: W face (Young grat)

[edit] East Ridge (AD)

Weisshorn E ridge

This is the ordinary route if any on the mountain can be described as such. Parties attempting the route need to be physically fit and well acclimatised: it is a long and tiring climb.


Weisshorn: East Ridge (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Randa (1,406 m0.874 miles
4,612.861 ft
)
Route Type Snow and Rock, II (6 - 8 h) Hut Weisshorn Hut (2,932 m1.822 miles
9,619.423 ft
)
Difficulty Rating AD AD Difficulty W2
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 1574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
    -    Valley - Hut: 1526 m0.948 miles
5,006.562 ft
    -    Valley - Summit: 3100 m1.926 miles
10,170.604 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa (Maps)


From the Weisshorn Hut follow the path NW to the edge of the Schali Glacier. Cross this almost horizontally towards a little snowy couloir cutting through the long rock rib close to Pt. 3,145 . Now climb the snow slope on the W side of the rib to the rocks at the top. Move R across snow and slabs (II) on to a shoulder which may be scree or snow covered and forms the end of a short, broad rib. This rib lies at the bottom of a broad buttress originating at Pt. 3,916 m. The continuing line of ascent is further L up another fairly prominent rib: it is not via the couloir on the R. Climb up the shoulder to the foot of the wall a little higher. Climb straight up the wall for a few m then descend slightly Lwards to a terrace (cairn). The whole of this section can be snow covered. Near the foot of the rib turn a steep wall on the L and then zigzag up the rib surmounting loose but short steps (well marked) as far as the lower rocks of the E ridge (beware stonefall from other parties: 3h).

The first section of ridge has a succession of small towers. Follow the crest, which is slabby and possibly verglassed, to the first of these and turn it on the N side but after this traverse all the teeth except one of the early ones which is particularly steep and is turned on the S side (stakes). Franz Lochmatter, the famous guide, fell from here in 1933. The very last tooth is turned on the R (1h).

The next section of ridge starts as a narrow and sometimes corniced snow ridge and then broadens and steepens. Climb the ridge without difficulty, passing Pt. 4,178 m to reach a bergschrund at 4,300 m (0.5 m). The slope continues to steepen and is followed more or less directly to the summit where a few rocks may be encountered. Late in the season the upper slopes may be icy, in which case it is probably better to climb the rocks on the S side of the ridge, especially close to the summit (1-1.5h).

Total climbing time is 6-8h.

[edit] South-South-West Ridge (Schaligrat) (D)

Weisshorn Schaligrat

An excellent climb on sound rock and in a wonderful setting: you are likely to have it to yourself. It is mainly a rock climb, at least in noral condition. Fairly sustained with a few pitches of IV.


Weisshorn: South-South-West Ridge (Schaligrat) (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Anniviers, Randa, Zermatt, Zinal
Route Type Mostly Rock, III - IV (5 - 7 h) Hut Schalijoch Bivouac (3,786 m2.353 miles
12,421.26 ft
)
Difficulty Rating D D Difficulty Rating AD AD
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 720 m0.447 miles
2,362.205 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa (Maps)


From the Schalijoch Bivouac climb the ridge, turning the first group of gendarmes on the R (E) side. Just above a particularly pointed gendarme return to the ridge at a snowy gap. From here keep to the ridge, traversing gendarmes (III and IV) or turning them on the R as seems appropriate until the ridge appears to peter out into the SSE face at about three-quarter height.

On the L is a couloir leading down the W face. Cross the top of this couloir and climb directly up the SE face of the tower beyond. The remaining gendarmes are all linked by exposed snow crests and are all traversed. Climbing time is 5-7h.

[edit] West Face (Younggrat) (D-)

The W face (or flank) of the Weisshorn appears to be nearly always in the shade. It is massive and seamed with ribs and couloirs which would suggest the possibility of a reasonable number of routes. Unfortunately it is a dangerous place and so there has been relatively little climbing activity, and what there is has been concentrated around the centre of the face, below the summit. One route in particular on this face stands out above all the others and it is the one described here. The most prominent feature on the N ridge is the Grand Gendarme. Projecting W from this is a long rock rib which has become universally known among alpinists as the Younggrat (after Geoffrey Winthrop Young who pioneered the route and was otherwise particularly active on this mountain, making first ascents of four routes and descent of three others, apart from his efforts in other parts of Valais). It is a good climb on steep, slabby rock and although some of it is loose this occurs where the climbing is easy. At one time Zinal guides tried to popularise the route and placed a large number of stakes and fixed rope. Much of this equipment was removed in 1965 but some of the stakes remain in place and are particularly useful in descent. Only attempt the route after a spell of dry weather otherwise verglas will be a problem.

The route is thought to be a quick means of descent from the summit but the point where the N ridge is abandoned is not easy to locate without prior knowledge and so the route should only be considered for this purpose if you need to get of the N ridge quickly in a storm.

Weisshorn W face


Weisshorn: West Face (Younggrat) (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Anniviers, Zinal
Route Type Snow and Rock, IV (7 - 8 h) Hut Ar Pitetta Hut (2,786 m1.731 miles
9,140.42 ft
)
Difficulty Rating D- D- Difficulty W2
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 1720 m1.069 miles
5,643.045 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa, SLK 1327: Evolène (Maps)


From the Ar Pitetta Hut head up stony moraine slopes to reach the Weisshorn Glacier on the N side of the continuation of the rib. Climb up the glacier passing Pt. 3,575 m and higher still cross the bergschrund. Reach the top of the snow slopes and the start of the rib (2.5-3h). Climb up easy but loose rock close to the edge of the rib which begins to steepen as the rock improves and the first of the stakes are found. Somewhat higher one is obliged to move L 20m by an imposing step in the ridge. Climb a steep wall 5m high (IV+ if done free) and then move back R (possibly snow) above the step. Now, for 200m, follow a series of slabs interpersed with easy ground. The slabs lead to the crest of the ridge. Here a fault line (chimney) leads R in 5m to the slabby couloir bordering the S side of the rib. Don't miss it! From the couloir make a rising R for 70m (poor protection) to below the col immediately S of the Grand Gendarme. Climb more or less directly up to the col (3-4h) and follow the ridge. The ridge now turns to snow, is quite narrow in places and may be corniced. Climb it (brilliant!) to the summit cross (1h).

Total climbing time is 7-8h.

[edit] Other West Face Routes

Various routes have been climbed on the face since the first in 1883. The easiest line (D) appears to be a combination of the three earliest ones. It starts high in the glacier bay N of Pt. 3,281 m and climbs on to the buttress on the R. Above this it follows a vague rib and then a couloir descending from the N ridge, 100m from the summit.

R. Dittert, L. Flory and F. Marulaz, 26 July 1945, reached the rib above Pt. 3,281 m from the L. They followed the rib to where it joins the central snowfield. Here they slanted L to a second rib, and followed this until it steepend. They finished by slanting L again to join the N ridge about halfway between the Grand Gendarme and the summit (TD: sound rock but threatened by stonefall).

Another, more direct route, climbs the same rib at the start, but reaches this by a line starting up the couloir in the centre of the face, before accepting the challenge of the steep upper part of the face. It was climbed in winter by F. and R. Theytaz, 28/29 Feb. and 1 March 1968. It has difficulties on rock up to V+ and is probably undergraded at TD. S. Albasini and C. Portmann, 20 Jan. 1989, followed the same route but finished by a line to the L of the Theytaz route (TD).

The most recent and by far the most difficult route on the face was climbed by the Slovenians Z. Petric and B. Pockar, June 1996. It takes a fairly direct line up the stoneswept snowfield and mixed ground to the R of the 1968 Direct Route. It is 1,150 m in height and has rock pitches of VI+ and ice between 60° and 75°. Unfortunately the pair disappeared later in the year whilst acclimatising on Kabru.

[edit] North Ridge (AD+)

In reality this is the NNW ridge but most alpinists refer to it as the N ridge. It has to be one of the best climbs in the Alps and is definitely a classic. It is long (2km) and maintains a height of over 4,000 m along its whole length from the summit of the Bishorn. It is not technically difficult (no more than III+), with what difficulties there are concentrated into the rock section which is about one quarter of the total length of the climb, but it should not be undertaken lightly. Escape from the ridge in poor conditions is not an appealing prospect so only set off on the crux section if you are convinced that the weather is going to remain fine.

Weisshorn N ridge Grand Gendarme


Weisshorn: North Ridge (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Anniviers, Zinal
Route Type Mostly Snow, III (7 - 9 h) Hut Tracuit Hut (3,256 m2.023 miles
10,682.415 ft
)
Difficulty Rating AD+ AD+ Difficulty W2
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 1250 m0.777 miles
4,101.05 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa, SLK 1327: Evolène (Maps)


From the summit of the Bishorn (which can be reached in 3h via the NW flank from the Tracuit Hut), follow the snow ridge SSW down to the Weisshornjoch and then continue along the ridge to the flat rocks at Pt. 4,203 m and the start of the crux section. If there is a lot of snow on the rocks, serious consideration should be given to abandoning the climb here (0.5h).

Descend the first step which is easy enough to down climb then follow the ridge, close to the crest, to a second step which can also be down climbed without much difficulty. A little further along the ridge reach a large tower which has to be turned. Do this on the L (E) side by a 10m traverse and then climb a dièdre-chimney for 20m (III+) to regain the crest. Continue to the saddle before the Grand Gendarme (Pt. 4,331 m). This can be turned fairly low on the E side across smooth slabs but this is not easy and any snow makes it particularly uninviting. It is better to climb it (or contour across its E face at about half-height). To do this traverse L for 5m then climb a dièdre and continuation chimney (III+) and then the ridge to the top. It is possible to traverse from the top of the chimney. Descent to the col on the S side by rappel (3-3.5h).

The ridge now turns to snow, is quite narrow in places and may be corniced. Climb it (brilliant!) to the summit cross (1h). 7-9h climbing from the Tracuit Hut.

[edit] North-East Buttress (TD)

Weisshorn NE face

The NE face of the Weisshorn , which has a height of almost 1,000 m at its highest point, is divided into two parts by an ill-defined buttress descending from the summit. Most of the routes that have been climbed on the face are concentrated around this buttress since it provides the best protection from the bands of seracs which threaten the greater part of the face. The climb itself is quite elegant but at the same time rather tedious and is probably best ascended early in the season when snow conditions are likely to be at their best. It is always a serious undertaking. The approach to the foot of the route can be impossible on account of crevasses and seracs. The mean angle is 48º.


Weisshorn: North-East Buttress (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Randa (1,406 m0.874 miles
4,612.861 ft
)
Route Type Snow, 48° (10 h) Hut Weisshorn Hut (2,932 m1.822 miles
9,619.423 ft
)
Difficulty Rating TD TD Difficulty W2
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 1574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
    -    Valley - Hut: 1526 m0.948 miles
5,006.562 ft
    -    Valley - Summit: 3100 m1.926 miles
10,170.604 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa (Maps)


From the Weisshorn Hut follow the path NW to the edge of the Schali Glacier. Head N up this, passing W of Pt. 3,240 m, to the saddle at Pt. 3,468 m. Further N is a ridge descending NE from Pt. 3,782 m. Cross this ridge by climbing the lower of two stony couloirs and have a good look from here to see if it is possible to reach the foot of the buttress. Cross the Bis Glacier to the start of the climb at the foot of the buttress on its N side (3h). This point can also be reached by crossing the Bisjoch from the Turtmann Hut or from the Topali Hut. In years of meagre snow cover the lower part of the buttress will be almost bare rock.

Climb the snow slope which is steep and broad at first but gradually narrows to a crest. Reach an icy nose which can be difficult and then continue at a gentler angle up a more open slope, avoiding any seracs as appropriate. Finish on the E ridge or continue by a direct line to the summit.

Total climbing time is 4-7h from the foot and up to 10h from the Weisshorn Hut.

[edit] East Face of North-East Buttress (TD)

This route climbs the E flank of the buttress so the approach to the start is not usually a problem. It was considered at the time of the first ascent, done under cold and snowy conditions, to be a major ice climb. There are objective dangers on the first half of the climb which should be completed in the dark or very first light. It is a bit steeper than the previous route with a slope reaching 60º. The lower part of the buttress on the E flank is formed by a series of rock ribs separated by icy couloirs. The route starts up the L-hand couloir which is R of the broadest rib.


Weisshorn: East Face of North-East Buttress (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Randa (1,406 m0.874 miles
4,612.861 ft
)
Route Type Mostly Snow, 60° (11 h) Hut Weisshorn Hut (2,932 m1.822 miles
9,619.423 ft
)
Difficulty Rating TD TD Difficulty W2
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 1574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
    -    Valley - Hut: 1526 m0.948 miles
5,006.562 ft
    -    Valley - Summit: 3100 m1.926 miles
10,170.604 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa (Maps)


From the Weisshorn Hut follow the path NW to the edge of the Schali Glacier. Head N up this, passing W of Pt. 3,240 m, to the saddle at Pt. 3,468 m. Further N is a ridge descending NE from Pt. 3,782 m. Cross this ridge by climbing the lower of two stony couloirs and have a good look from here to see if it is possible to reach the foot of the buttress. Cross the Bis Glacier to the start of the climb at the foot of the buttress (3h). Climb the couloir (mixed) to the snow/ice slope above and then slant up Rwards to reach the R side of the low profile rock rib which extends up to the whole of the E flank of the buttress. Continue straight up to the crest of the buttress and join the other routes to the summit.

Climbing time is 6-8h from the foot and up to 11h from the Weisshorn Hut.

[edit] North-East Face Direct (D+/TD)

Esentially an ice climb with a slope varying in steepness betzeen 45º and 55º and taking a very direct line to the summit, starting from the point on the L (N) side of the NE buttress where it merges into the rest of the face. Threatened by seracs from below the E ridge.


Weisshorn: North-East Face Direct (edit infobox)
Summit Approach
Summit Weisshorn (4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
)
Valley base(s) Randa (1,406 m0.874 miles
4,612.861 ft
)
Route Type Snow, 55° (10 h) Hut Weisshorn Hut (2,932 m1.822 miles
9,619.423 ft
)
Difficulty Rating TD TD Difficulty W2
Height Gains Hut - Summit: 1574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
    -    Valley - Hut: 1526 m0.948 miles
5,006.562 ft
    -    Valley - Summit: 3100 m1.926 miles
10,170.604 ft
Useful Maps SLK 1328: Randa (Maps)


From the Weisshorn Hut follow the path NW to the edge of the Schali Glacier. Head N up this, passing W of Pt. 3,240 m, to the saddle at Pt. 3,468 m. Further N is a ridge descending NE from Pt. 3,782 m. Cross this ridge by climbing the lower of two stony couloirs and have a good look from here to see if it is possible to reach the foot of the buttress. Cross the Bis Glacier to the start of the climb at the foot of the buttress (3h).

Start at the foot of the central avalanche runnel close to a rock wall on its L bank. Cross the bergschrund then slant R towards the edge of the rock wall and climb up alongside this and out of the line of fire of serac fall. Continue in a direct line, above the rocks, to the summit. There is the possibility of a steep pitch to pass a final serac barrier close to the summit.

Climbing time is 7h from the foot, 10h from the Weisshorn Hut.

[edit] Overview

Route Name Hei. Dif. Dur. (h) Type Rock ° Valley Hut S. Gain Maps
Weisshorn: East Ridge 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
GAD 6-8 Snow and Rock II Randa Weisshorn Hut 1,574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
1328
Weisshorn: South-South-West Ridge (Schaligrat) 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
JD 5-7 Mostly Rock III-IV Anniviers, Randa, Zermatt, Zinal Schalijoch Bivouac Hut 720 m0.447 miles
2,362.205 ft
1328
Weisshorn: West Face (Younggrat) 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
ID- 7-8 Snow and Rock IV Anniviers, Zinal Arpitettaz Hut 1,720 m1.069 miles
5,643.045 ft
1328, 1327
Weisshorn: North Ridge 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
HAD+ 7-9 Mostly Snow III Anniviers, Zinal Tracuit Hut 1,250 m0.777 miles
4,101.05 ft
1328, 1327
Weisshorn: North-East Buttress 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
MTD 10 Snow 48 Randa Weisshorn Hut 1,574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
1328
Weisshorn: East Face of North-East Buttress 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
MTD 11 Mostly Snow 60 Randa Weisshorn Hut 1,574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
1328
Weisshorn: North-East Face Direct 4,506 m2.8 miles
14,783.465 ft
MTD 10 Snow 55 Randa Weisshorn Hut 1,574 m0.978 miles
5,164.042 ft
1328

Hei.:Height, Dif.: Difficulty, Dur.: Duration, S. Gain: Meters from hut to summit
Summit map is always listed first. If a map is used for 2 km and another map for 1 km, the 2 km map will be listed before the 1 km map. Overview of the Swiss maps & Italian maps.

[edit] Additional photos

[edit] External links

Weisshorn on SummitPost

[edit] Recommended books

      The Alpine 4000m Peaks by the Classic Routes by Richard Goedeke

      Valais Alps East: Selected Climbs (Alpine Club Guides) by Les Swindin

      Valais Alps West: Selected Climbs (Alpine Club Guides) by Lindsay Griffin

      Alpine Climbing: Techniques to Take You Higher (Mountaineers Outdoor Expert) by Cathy Cosley

      Valais West: Zinal - Arolla - Verbier - Rhone Valley (Rother Walking Guide) by Michael Waeber & Hans Steinbichler

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